PHOTOGRAPHY LIVE AND UNCUT NO. 107 WITH MATT HART

Matt Hart

Matt Hart

I've known Matt Hart for a couple of years and to be honest I have always wanted him to be a guest on Photography Live and Uncut. There is a saying better late than never and this show didn't disappoint. Matt Hart has been a photographer since he can remember. Starting to take photos at a very young age setting up his own darkroom in his parents attic and gaining his knowledge by the good old fashioned route of talking to knowledgable people in the camera stores - which unfortunately these days are very few and far between - about film, paper and chemicals. Initially a Nikon shooter Matt switched to the Fujifilm X series system of which he is now a Fuji X-Photographer. Matt has never been busier what with Fuji representation and commitments, his own commercial work plus now his enthusiasm for the Fujiholics group of which he is a founding member. Matt specialises in street photography and you can see and learn from the Screenshare section of the show, his work and his passion for street photography. As he says 'there's nothing better than to get out and take photographs!'

Thanks Matt

The all important links...

Photography Live and uncut with Matt Hart

The Matt Hart website  : Matt Hart Blog - Light Traveler

Matt on Instagram   : Matt on Flickr

The Fujiholics - A social media group.

Photography : "Live and Uncut" - Episode 62 with Gagan Sadana

Just one image...

Gagan Sadana      I first met Gagan Sadana a couple of months ago when we were on the street walk organised by  Spyros, for The London Street Hunters  meet-up in June of this year. It wasn't until I got talking to him did I realise that he was relatively new to photography. You wouldn't think that when you see his work and also appreciate his understanding of what he is looking for in a street image.  Gagan came to the UK 10 years ago and bought a  Nikon D3100 , really just to have camera for family photos and days out. But slowly his interest in photography built and he found that he needed to take his camera out when ever he could. He is an IT consultant project manger and makes visits to London from his Kent home on a regular basis. It's these business trips that gives him the opportunity to make street photographs.  He studied the videos from  That Nikon Guy (Matt Granger)  and the work by  Rinzi Ruiz ,  Thomas Le  uthard  and  Eric Kim . These are the photographers that inspired Gagan to start street photography. He first started shooting with his iPhone on the street. He found this to be a suitable starter to build his confidence until the time was right to move to his Dslr on the street. Interesting to note here that Ggagan's father was a photographer and he is a firm believer like me, that skill in photography and art is an innate ability, as he never thought of picking up a camera before he came to the UK. He had found no interest in it, apart from looking at his fathers great photos.  Using the business trips that he takes to London is Gagan's unique approach to street photography. Its unique in that he only uses about 15 minutes of his time before and after the meetings. He prefers to wait and stay in one spot looking for that moment. He studies the light and prefers to produce a high contrast image. The majority of his subjects are people going about their working day rather than those being out for the day as you would normally observe on a days street walk about. Gagan is happy even if just one image is the image for the day.  He recently has become an Ambassador for  Lumix . He uses the  Lumix GX7  which he uses for his street photography. The camera is a 4/3 sensor size unit, with a silent shutter plus with a flip up screen. His preferred lenses at the moment are the 24mm or the 8mm fish-eye lens. The camera even with the lens attached is compact and easy to handle unlike his Nikon D3100. Gagan has the opportunity to attend the Lumix workshops in his role of an Ambassador, to talk about his experiences with the Lumix cameras. In this role he doesn't have to review equipment by writing blogs and making You Tube videos, as with Fuji,  Panasonic  are just happy to get some feedback from their users. He has also had a number of images, which he submitted for selection, added to a book called  'World Street Photography 2015' . A book printed for charity with a limited print run. They are quite rare you'll do well to find one! Gagan has also had images shown at photo exhibitions.  There are several people that have inspired his photography, those being his wife - his most severest of critics (in a good way), his father and  Thomas Leuthard !   His favourite photographer is Thomas Leuthard but there are many others that he enjoys looking at on Flickr, Facebook, web sites and in print at exhibitions.  Thanks Gagan.  Until next time "Leave your camera bag at home"     The all important links...   The website for Gagan Sadana    Gagan on Facebook    Gagan on Twitter    Gagan on Google+    Gagan on Flickr    Gagan's blog on Tumblr    G  agan on Instagram       The Royal Photographic Society       

Gagan Sadana

 

I first met Gagan Sadana a couple of months ago when we were on the street walk organised by Spyros, for The London Street Hunters meet-up in June of this year. It wasn't until I got talking to him did I realise that he was relatively new to photography. You wouldn't think that when you see his work and also appreciate his understanding of what he is looking for in a street image.

Gagan came to the UK 10 years ago and bought a Nikon D3100, really just to have camera for family photos and days out. But slowly his interest in photography built and he found that he needed to take his camera out when ever he could. He is an IT consultant project manger and makes visits to London from his Kent home on a regular basis. It's these business trips that gives him the opportunity to make street photographs.

He studied the videos from That Nikon Guy (Matt Granger) and the work by Rinzi RuizThomas Leuthard and Eric Kim. These are the photographers that inspired Gagan to start street photography. He first started shooting with his iPhone on the street. He found this to be a suitable starter to build his confidence until the time was right to move to his Dslr on the street. Interesting to note here that Ggagan's father was a photographer and he is a firm believer like me, that skill in photography and art is an innate ability, as he never thought of picking up a camera before he came to the UK. He had found no interest in it, apart from looking at his fathers great photos.

Using the business trips that he takes to London is Gagan's unique approach to street photography. Its unique in that he only uses about 15 minutes of his time before and after the meetings. He prefers to wait and stay in one spot looking for that moment. He studies the light and prefers to produce a high contrast image. The majority of his subjects are people going about their working day rather than those being out for the day as you would normally observe on a days street walk about. Gagan is happy even if just one image is the image for the day.

He recently has become an Ambassador for Lumix. He uses the Lumix GX7 which he uses for his street photography. The camera is a 4/3 sensor size unit, with a silent shutter plus with a flip up screen. His preferred lenses at the moment are the 24mm or the 8mm fish-eye lens. The camera even with the lens attached is compact and easy to handle unlike his Nikon D3100. Gagan has the opportunity to attend the Lumix workshops in his role of an Ambassador, to talk about his experiences with the Lumix cameras. In this role he doesn't have to review equipment by writing blogs and making You Tube videos, as with Fuji, Panasonic are just happy to get some feedback from their users. He has also had a number of images, which he submitted for selection, added to a book called 'World Street Photography 2015'. A book printed for charity with a limited print run. They are quite rare you'll do well to find one! Gagan has also had images shown at photo exhibitions.

There are several people that have inspired his photography, those being his wife - his most severest of critics (in a good way), his father and Thomas Leuthard

His favourite photographer is Thomas Leuthard but there are many others that he enjoys looking at on Flickr, Facebook, web sites and in print at exhibitions.

Thanks Gagan.

Until next time "Leave your camera bag at home"

 

The all important links...

The website for Gagan Sadana

Gagan on Facebook

Gagan on Twitter

Gagan on Google+

Gagan on Flickr

Gagan's blog on Tumblr

Gagan on Instagram

 

The Royal Photographic Society

 

 

Photography : "Live and Uncut" - Episode 52 with a few friends.

Making photography friends.

After a recent walkabout in London organised by RSP host Michael Rammell, I thought it would be a good idea to share our thoughts and ideas on street photography on 'Live and Uncut'. So Peter Kelly, Katy Memon, Joseph Zee and Michael Rammell joined me for this episode.

It was a shame that we experienced some interference during the broadcast, which I hope doesn't spoil the show when you watch it. We all come from different backgrounds some following a semi professional career in photography others purely as amateurs. But the one thing we have in common is the love of street photography.

It was interesting to find out how they got into street photographers : Katy is relatively new to 'street' preferring to use a DSLR which is her tool for her style of photographer in that she is looking to develop her photographic career in conceptual art photography. Her first camera was the point and shoot plastic film camera. Took a course in City in Guilds and bought the 400d Canon then onto her present 6D Canon. her main camera... Which is in contrast to the majority of the group that use mirrorless cameras. A smaller inconspicuous camera. Peter started late in photography by buying the Canon 7D in 2011 and converted to Fuji X-Pro1 recently. He is an event and glamour photographer that enjoys getting out on the streets but preferring to shoot objects and abstracts as against shooting the human element. Joseph has been involved in  photography from an early age with his uncle who was a keen photographer and Joseph remembers was always in the 'darkroom'. His first camera was a Konica then a Fuji then moved through Canon and Nikon until recently when he switched to the Fuji X-T1. He is an amateur photographer that specialises in HDR of city scenes. Michael got back into photography seriously with a Sony NEX3 moved onto the Canon 550D then to the 7D and finally back into 'mirrorless' with the Olympus OMD-EM5. Unusual probably my only guest to date that started with mirrorless got into DSLR the returned back to mirrorless. Michael is a wedding and like me an avid street photographer.

All apart from Katy we have switched from DSLR's to our mirrorless cameras because of the weight issue. Both Peter and Michael use their kit for their professional work. Neither have had any problems, loss of quality in the images or printed work even the awkward questions / comments by their clients asking 'what are you using?' Katy's set up is different in that as she looks to set up her Conceptual Art photography business its important for her to stay with what she knows. Wise words as so many photographers change gear at the wrong time and get lost in a myriad of menus and can't concentrate on the job at hand and making good work.

When we went to screen share I really enjoyed viewing the different styles that my guests showed. Michael's work in Mono (which, I think he prefers) it was lovely that the guests started to make comments about each others work. His work that I would say is 'true street'. where he observes the human element behaviour and background scenes associated with the subject. Seeing images that are there which many will simply walk on past. A super set of images. Peters work again showing the human element in street photography with models and passers by plus the ability to spot the comical image and the an eye for the abstract. Joseph's work is different in that while he is still learning street photography and taking images with the human element but he is experimenting with angles and views. But his 'forte' is the taking of cityscape images and the processing and development of editing from HDR (3 bracket shots) to merged images in LR6 and using filters and with plugins. Katy without doubt has a great photographers eye. This is evident in the shot of the 'floating' street performer choosing not to take the image straight on as many of us would but from behind and being bold enough to crop drastically a study of the legs with the passers by looking at him. Brilliant! Other photographs that she showed were just as good. Where she sees images which many others would not see. For some one who has only been into street photography for a short while she shows an innate ability. 

It was unfortunate that we started at this point to get quite a lot of connection problems. But at least we were able to complete our discussion on the screen share. It was a great selection of work and interesting how even though we were all on the same walk we all saw and spotted different opportunities, images and stories,

For the future; Peter plans to continue with his modelling photography and a trip to Columbia: Joseph intends to continue his street photography but is looking to 'print' more of his work and look to get a book printed: Michael will be looking to develop his RSP community/group, start printing his work more and get back on track with his wedding photography venture: Katy on the other hand has a plan to move toward her interest in fantasy/conceptual fine-art genre professionally. She is steadily building contacts within this style of work such as models and photographers. I wish them all the very best of luck with their future plans.

So as the Google+ Gremlins struck again,  I had to bring the show to a close. It was a pleasure to have Peter, Katy, Joseph and Michael on the show, good friends and all great photographers in their own right.

Google+ closed down in a very strange way!

Thanks guys.

Until next time "leave your camera bag at home"

 

Nb. Thanks to Michael Rammell who helped me out by messaging and getting my guests back online. Thanks.

 

The all important links...

Photography Live and Uncut : Episode no. 52 - Street Talking

For Michael Rammell:

Ready Steady Pro (RSP) on Facebook - The Michael Rammell website - on Google+ - and Facebook

For Peter Kelly

On Facebook - LondonEvents and - The Peter Kelly website

 For Joseph Zee

On Facebook - On Google+ and - on 500px

For Katy Memon

On Facebook

Photography : "Live and Uncut" - Episode 45 with Trevor Cole

An Educator - in more ways than one!

My guest this week was Trevor Cole. I came across Trevor from my previous guest Chris Marquardt. Chris spoke so highly of Trevor's work, that I just had to check out his work and what amazing work it is. It's my intention to diversify the program a little by having more landscape photographers on the show, and what a guest to get this initiative started.

Trevor Cole lives in Dunfanaghy, on the north coast of Donegal, Ireland. Born in Derry he qualified as a geography teacher but decided to travel with his vision of teaching and photographing the geography that he is so passionate about, for 24 years! His travels covered many many countries such as Singapore, West Africa, Italy, Ethiopia and Brazil. His first recollection of a camera though was using a Kodak Instamatic 110 - Isn't it amazing how many photographers I have spoken to have said that this was their first camera! At an early age he was able to travel with his parents and he persuaded them to buy him his first real camera - A Rollieflex SLR. Everything was manual but as Trevor said what a way to learn photography. His film choice was Fuji Velvia transparency film. A firm favourite with the landscape colour photographers. From the Rollieflex Trevor switched to a Minolta 7000 which he used until switching to Nikon in 1990 when he bought the Nikon F90x.

Photography really started for him when he got the Rolliflex SLR, which became a passion for him when travelling the world. Although geography has always been his main passion his travel triggered the use of the camera. He is not a mainstream 'landscape' photographer he says, there's nothing more than he enjoys most by walking the streets taking portrait shots of the local people or capturing a street scene.

He switched to digital when he moved to Ethiopia in 2006 and bought into the Nikon system with a Nikon D200 with 70-300, 18-200 (his favourite lens at the time), a 20 and 50mm lenses. Since then his equipment has expanded considerably, using now on a regular basis the Nikon D800 and D750 full frame cameras.

Studying his work on 500px through his site (link below) you can see the excellence of his work. He is not just a landscape photographer you will see on this site many street portraits where Trevor has stopped and spoken to local people, where he has captured the soul of the individual. Focus of his portraits is on the eyes and shown with such clarity they are glass like - almost marblesque like. A number of portraits have been taken in countries where you might think it difficult to do, given religious beliefs and barriers. One thing you will notice about his work is how he works with the light. Using it to produce stunning street portraits. His photographs cover a multitude of countries, such as Ethiopia, Somalia and Iceland all finalised with very little editing in Lightroom. Although the majority of his work is in colour there are a number of classic mono images.  Living in these countries for a period of time, of course helped with any potential language barriers. Generally he got by with the local language!

Trevor has never been tempted away from his Nikon cameras to any other manufacturer, but he did say that the mirror-less cameras might tempt him in the future as he recognises the exponential growth of the mirror-less camera range. Of course not withstanding the small lens stable that the new manufacturers have in the market, they don't have anything close, at this time anything, to what the Nikon and Canon ranges do. His go to camera would be the Nikon D750 but if it was just to a party of friends or dinner or for a bit of fun he'd take his iPhone!

His future plans? He would love to develop his workshop to reflect the quality of the landscape and scenery that he has on his doorstep in County Donegal, the local scenery is exceptional - sounds like a place I've got to visit! He'd love to take his workshops to well known destinations that he knows well. Places like Ethiopia, Namibia, Iceland, Madagascar and Costa Rica. His final wish, would be to do a humanitarian photography. One such as a project of a refugee camp and to get his work published. This is not for the faint hearted but with Trevors' experience of living and travelling through countries, such as Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kazakstan and the Himalayas, he says he has seen 'a lot', which does take some getting used to, and I can say that from personal experience myself. 

His favourite photographer and inspiration for his photography would be Sebastiao Salgado. Trevor enthuses over this photographer's work, which when you listen or watch the video you will understand his thoughts and comments. Other photographers that come to mind when we talked were Steve McCurry, Mary Ellen Mark, Henri Cartier Bresson and Don McCullin. They all bring their photography projects to us with dedication and skill.

This episode was truly, for me, an eye opener. Not only the skill that Trevor possesses with his image making but also his comments and views on photographers and the many countries that he has lived and worked in, not to mention those that he has travelled through.

Thanks Trevor for a wonderful show.

And Finally "leave your camera bag at home"

 

The all important links:

Photography "Live and Uncut" - Episode no 45 with Trevor Cole.

Trevor Cole - Alternative Visions

Trevor's website

Trevor on 500px

Trevor on Facebook

Trevor on Twitter

Trevor on Wordpress his Blog

Trevor on Pinterest

Trevor on Google+